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The Society for Research into Higher Education


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Spanish Science and Education in turbulent times

The SRHE Blog is now read in more than 100 countries worldwide, and we have therefore decided to introduce publications in more than one language. The first is Michele Girotto’s analysis of the prospects for Catalonian universities in the turbulent Spanish context – click on ‘Version en español below to jump to the Spanish language version of this post. In the next few months we hope to post blogs in French, Russian, Portuguese, Chinese and more. SRHE members worldwide are encouraged to forward this notification, especially to non-English-speaking colleagues. 

New contributions are welcome, especially if they address topical issues of policy or practice in countries other than England and the USA. Submissions may be written either in English or in the author’s native language. Please send all contributions to the Editor, rob.cuthbert@uwe.ac.uk

La educación y la ciencia en épocas turbulentas  Version en español

Media platforms show many experts reflecting on the need for a new journalism capable of facing the challenges of a turbulent environment. The role of journalism is to tell the truth as faithfully as possible, which is a greater challenge in complex times. The role of the press is also essential for public management accountability. However, citizens’ trust in mainstream media is shrinking, especially when they are looking for independent and trustworthy information. The Edelman Trust Barometer for Spain,[1] published at the beginning of this year, acknowledged that Spaniards’ decline in trust also involved companies and governments, besides the media. There is a widespread decline in citizens’ trust across the world. The Barometer recognised a downturn in 21 of the 28 countries analysed, with an average level of 47 per cent. Spain’s level of trust declined from 46 to 44 percent. In the light of conspiracy theories and the abundance of barely verified information – ‘fake news’ – many people do not know for certain what or whom to believe. The easiest option involves believing whatever you want, with clear adverse effects.
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