srhe

The Society for Research into Higher Education

Restructuring of the Irish Institutes of Technology sector

Leave a comment

The SRHE Blog is now read in more than 100 countries worldwide, and we have therefore decided to introduce publications in more than one language. Click on ‘Version en español below to jump to the Spanish language version of this post. In the next few months we hope to post blogs in French, Russian, Portuguese, Chinese and more. SRHE members worldwide are encouraged to forward this notification, especially to non-English-speaking colleagues. 

New contributions are welcome, especially if they address topical issues of policy or practice in countries other than England and the USA. Submissions may be written either in English or in the author’s native language. Please send all contributions to the Editor, rob.cuthbert@uwe.ac.uk

La Reestructuración de los Institutos de Tecnología en Irlanda Version en español

By Tanya Zubrzycki

Consistent with global trends, the expansion of higher education in Ireland is occurring at a rapid pace, with a pressing need to make the system more efficient and responsive to the needs of society.

Ireland has a binary higher education system with fourteen Institutes of Technology (IoTs) representing the second-largest sector in student enrolments after the universities. The IoTs are spread throughout the island and have traditionally served an important regional mission.

Evolution of the restructuring policy

The discussion started in 2004 with the OECD’s review of the Irish higher education, underpinned by Ireland’s strategic objectives of “placing its higher education system in the top ranks of OECD in terms of both quality and levels of participation” and “creating a world class research, development and innovation capacity” per the Lisbon Strategy.1 The review noted the country’s large number of HE institutions, some of relatively smaller size, which could have cost implications for building the research infrastructure.1

Then in 2011, the Irish ‘National Strategy for Higher Education to 2030’ was launched, for the first time proposing amalgamations of IoTs into a smaller number of stronger institutes to “advance system capacity and performance”, followed by potential designation of some as Technological Universities (TUs).2

The Technological Universities Bill of 2015 (TU Bill) further defined the criteria for a merger (of two or more institutes) and designation as a TU. Among the various eligibility criteria is a specified proportion of academic staff with doctoral and professional equivalent qualifications, and a percentage of research students. TUs would gradually increase these proportions, and also expand regionally relevant research, continue to support the needs of business, enterprise and the professions through innovation and new knowledge, and strengthen international collaborations in education and research, among other functions.3 Currently, four consortia of IoTs are “engaged with the process to become designated as Technological Universities” (details in Notes below).4

Considerations around the restructuring

Despite the potential benefits, the restructuring of this scale can be challenging. The IoTs offer Honours Bachelor degree programmes and are engaged to varying degrees in Masters and Doctoral education. However, they also have a strong presence at levels 6 and 7 (in the Irish 10-level National Framework of Qualifications)5 providing, for example, the majority of Higher Certificate and Ordinary Bachelor degree courses in Ireland, and enrolling a diverse student base: the National Strategy warns against any loss of this mission.2

It would therefore be important to prevent ‘mission drift’ at levels 6 and 7 in the newly established institutions. A TU would also need to “have sufficient standing to be fully accepted as a ‘university’”.5 The TU Bill addresses these matters by promoting excellence in teaching and learning “at all levels of higher education within the Framework”, while also underpinning the institutions’ stronger research profile and further developing the international dimension, among other functions.3

Engagement with stakeholders and changes to the TU Bill

Various issues relating to the TU Bill were raised by the Teachers’ Union of Ireland (representing the IoTs’ academic staff members). The consultation process that followed resulted in proposed changes to the TU Bill, some of which are: protection of terms and conditions of service for academic staff; enhancing the governing body membership in a potential TU; strengthening of the TU’s regional mission to “serve the community and public interest”; and making the merger and TU designation a one-step process, rather than a requirement to merge before applying for the TU status.6

As of December 2017, the TU Bill incorporating the changes has been re-introduced at the Committee Stage in Dáil Éireann and is expected to be passed in the near future.

 

SRHE member Tanya Zubrzycki is a PhD student in Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. She is also a Researcher in Higher Education Research Centre (HERC), Dublin City University.

 

 

Notes and references

1 OECD (2006). Higher Education in Ireland. Reviews of National Policies for Education. OECD Publishing, pp.3,36.

2 Government of Ireland (2011). National Strategy for Higher Education to 2030. Report of the Strategy Group. Ireland: Department of Education and Skills, p.102.

3 Technological Universities Bill 2015 As initiated. Dublin.

4 The following four consortia are “engaged with the process to become designated as Technological Universities”:

1) TU4Dublin (Dublin Institute of Technology, Institute of Technology Tallaght, Institute of Technology Blanchardstown),

2) Technological University for the South-East (TUSE – consisting of Waterford Institute of Technology and Institute of Technology Carlow),

3) Munster Technological University (MTU – consisting of Cork Institute of Technology and Institute of Technology Tralee),

4) Connacht-Ulster Alliance (CUA – consisting of Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology, Institute of Technology Sligo and Letterkenny Institute of Technology).

(Adapted from Merrionstreet.ie, Irish Government News Service (17 July, 2017). Minister Bruton and Minister Mitchell O’Connor Secure Government Approval to Progress Technological Universities Bill [Release]).

5 Marginson, S. (2011). Criteria for Technological University Designation. Dublin: HEA, p.3.

6 Merrionstreet.ie, Irish Government News Service (17 July, 2017). Minister Bruton and Minister Mitchell O’Connor Secure Government Approval to Progress Technological Universities Bill [Release].

 

Version en español

La Reestructuración de los Institutos de Tecnología en Irlanda

Por Tanya Zubrzycki

 

A la par con las tendencias mundiales, la expansión de la educación superior en Irlanda está ocurriendo rápido, con una necesidad apremiante de hacer que el sistema sea más eficiente y receptivo a las necesidades de la sociedad.

Irlanda tiene un sistema binario de educación superior con catorce Institutos de Tecnología (IoT) que representan el segundo sector más grande de matrículas estudiantiles después de las universidades. Los IoT se encuentran por toda la isla y tradicionalmente han cumplido una misión regional importante.

Evolución de la política de reestructuración

La discusión comenzó en el 2004 con la revisión de la educación superior irlandesa por parte de la OCDE, respaldada por los objetivos estratégicos de Irlanda de “colocar su sistema de educación superior en los primeros rangos de la OCDE en términos de calidad y niveles de participación” y “crear capacidad de investigación, desarrollo e innovación de calibre mundial” según la Estrategia de Lisboa.1 La revisión destacó el gran número de instituciones de educación superior del país, algunas de tamaño relativamente pequeño, lo que podría tener implicaciones en los costos para la construcción de la infraestructura de investigación.1

Luego, en 2011, se lanzó la “Estrategia Nacional para la Educación Superior hasta 2030”, proponiendo por primera vez fusiones para reducir el número de los IoT y crear institutos más fuertes para “mejorar la capacidad y el rendimiento del sistema”, seguido de la posible designación de algunos como Universidades Tecnológicas (UT).2

La Ley de Universidades Tecnológicas de 2015 (Ley UT) definió los criterios para una fusión (de dos o más institutos) y designación como UT. Entre los diversos criterios de elegibilidad se encuentra una proporción específica de estudiantes de investigación, y un porcentaje de personal académico con calificaciones de doctorado y equivalentes profesionales. Las UT necesitarían aumentar gradualmente estas proporciones, y también ampliarían la investigación regional pertinente, seguirían respaldando las necesidades de las empresas y las profesiones mediante la innovación y nuevos conocimientos, y fortalecerían las colaboraciones internacionales en educación e investigación, entre otras funciones.3 Actualmente, cuatro grupos de IoT “participan en el proceso para ser designados como Universidades Tecnológicas” (detalles en las Notas a continuación).4

Consideraciones sobre la reestructuración

A pesar de los beneficios potenciales, la reestructuración de esta escala puede ser un reto. Los IoT ofrecen programas de ‘Honours Bachelor degree’ y están involucrados en diversos grados en la educación de Maestría y Doctorado. Al mismo tiempo, brindan la mayoría de los cursos de Nivel 6 y 7 en Irlanda (incluyendo, por ejemplo, los cursos de ‘Higher Certificate’ y ‘Ordinary Bachelor degree’ en el Marco Nacional de Cualificaciones de 10 niveles en Irlanda) y promueven la diversidad entre los estudiantes: la Estrategia Nacional advierte contra cualquier pérdida de esta misión.2

Por lo tanto, sería importante evitar una “mission drift” en los niveles 6 y 7 en las Universidades Tecnológicas. Una UT también necesitaría que poseer los criterios suficientes para ser plenamente aceptada como una ‘universidad’.5 La Ley UT aborda estos asuntos promoviendo la excelencia en la enseñanza y el aprendizaje “en todos los niveles de la educación superior dentro del Marco”3 y también brindando a las instituciones un perfil de investigación más sólido y desarrollando aún más la dimensión internacional, entre otras funciones.

Compromiso con grupos de interés y cambios en la Ley UT

El Teachers’ Union of Ireland (que representa a los miembros del personal académico de los IoT) planteó varios asuntos relacionados con la Ley UT. El proceso de consulta que siguió dio lugar a cambios propuestos a la Ley UT, algunos de los cuales son la protección de los términos y condiciones de servicio para el personal académico; un aumento de la membresía de los órganos de gobierno de posibles UT; el fortalecimiento de la misión regional de los UT para “servir a la comunidad y al interés público”, y hacer que la fusión y la designación UT sean un proceso de un solo paso, en lugar de un requisito para fusionarse antes de solicitar el estatus de UT.6

A partir de diciembre de 2017, la Ley UT que incorpora los cambios se reintrodujo en el ‘Committee Stage’ del Dáil Éireann y se espera que sea aprobada en un futuro próximo.

Tanya Zubrzycki es estudiante de doctorado en Trinity College Dublin, Irlanda. También es Investigadora en el Centro de Investigación de Educación Superior (HERC), Dublin City University.

 

Notes and references

1 OECD (2006). Higher Education in Ireland. Reviews of National Policies for Education. OECD Publishing, pp.3,36. Citas traducidas de inglés por T. Zubrzycki.

2 Government of Ireland (2011). National Strategy for Higher Education to 2030. Report of the Strategy Group. Ireland: Department of Education and Skills, p.102. Citas traducidas de inglés por T. Zubrzycki.

3 Technological Universities Bill 2015 As initiated. Dublin.

4 Los siguientes cuatro grupos de IoT “participan en el proceso para ser designados como Universidades Tecnológicas” (traducido de inglés por T. Zubrzycki):

1) TU4Dublin (Dublin Institute of Technology, Institute of Technology Tallaght, Institute of Technology Blanchardstown),

2) Technological University for the South-East (TUSE – consisting of Waterford Institute of Technology and Institute of Technology Carlow),

3) Munster Technological University (MTU – consisting of Cork Institute of Technology and Institute of Technology Tralee),

4) Connacht-Ulster Alliance (CUA – consisting of Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology, Institute of Technology Sligo and Letterkenny Institute of Technology).

(Adaptado de Merrionstreet.ie, Irish Government News Service (17 July, 2017). Minister Bruton and Minister Mitchell O’Connor Secure Government Approval to Progress Technological Universities Bill [Release]).

5 Marginson, S. (2011). Criteria for technological university designation. Dublin: HEA, p.3. Traducido de inglés por T. Zubrzycki.

6 Merrionstreet.ie, Irish Government News Service (17 July, 2017). Minister Bruton and Minister Mitchell O’Connor Secure Government Approval to Progress Technological Universities Bill [Release].

Author: SRHE News Blog

An international learned society, concerned with supporting research and researchers into Higher Education

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s